Secret Opening Compass Rose Chartography Box

In stock
$45.00
Product quantity can be updated in the shopping cart
Dimensions & Weight:
Exterior-
7 1/8 inches (18.1 cm) wide, 4 7/8 inches (12.4 cm) long, 3 1/8 inches (7.9 cm) tall

Interior-
6 3/8 inches (16.2 cm) wide, 4 1/8 inches (10.5 cm) long, 2 inches (5.1 cm) tall

10.7 ounces (303 grams)

Product Features:
Handcrafted in Southern Poland's mysterious Tatra Mountains
Top of box is decorated with a compass rose design that has been burned into the wood by hand
This special box also features a hidden locking mechanism (front legs)
Custom brass plaques available for the front or inside lid

Full Description:
The Secret Opening Compass Rose Cartography Box is a one of a kind storage box for your trinkets, keepsakes, jewelry, or memorabilia.  The box is made of Linden wood, is reinforced with feather joints, and the base of the interior is lined with red velvet to protect your personal treasures.  The top of the box is decorated with a compass rose design that has been burned into the wood by hand.  The compass rose is stained with both light and dark finishes, and both the Cardinal and Ordinal directions are burned into the wood at each point.  This special box also features a hidden locking mechanism to keep unwanted visitors away.  When the box is closed the front legs can be turned to engage or release the locks.

A custom engraved brass plaque can be mounted on the front base of the box and a longer message can be engraved for the inside lid.  The exterior of the box measures 7 1/8 inches (18.1 cm) wide, 4 7/8 inches (12.4 cm) long, 3 1/8 inches (7.9 cm) tall and weighs 9.5 ounces (269.3 grams).  The interior of the box measures 6 3/8 inches (16.2 cm) wide, 4 1/8 inches (10.5 cm) long, and 2 inches (5.1 cm) tall.

Handcrafted in Southern Poland's mysterious Tatra Mountains, the Secret Opening Compass Rose Cartography Box is a unique Polish box.  Farmers and shepherds settled into the Tatra region of the Carpathian Mountains called Podhale toward the end of the first millennium AD.  During the winter months as their fields lay under snow, the farmers spent their days working wood.  Every member of the family participated in the decoration of these fine boxes.  Most local art cooperatives were members of Cepelia, the national arts and crafts institution, which set up very stringent controls and standards on craft production and completely monopolized trade in crafts.  This policy resulted in strict, meticulous production of very high quality, non-commercialized handmade products.  Wood burning and inlays were added as decoration techniques.  Colored stains added a new dimension to the designs and varnishes were applied to protect the decorated surfaces.

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